GSXR55

Rotella T oil?

64 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, crash said:

If it leaks or burns enough oil you should never have to change it. Just add more and you'll always have fresh oil. :) Not sure what to do about that filter though. :(

Dont worry about the filter--it has an internal bypass. And the oil pump has a pressure relief valve. At this point dirty unfiltered oil is better than no oil. The real fun happens when the oil pump pickup screen clogs.Then you get to call 1-800-CRANKSHAFT

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I hear all that your saying people

 

first of I never said thicker then recomended

 

i have had and have three vehicles over two hundred K and one gas engine to 500 K - rember I'm RR

 

still say don't care what anyone else says (if you use the thick end of what's called for and you warm up before driving - like I do 95% of the time - your ride will live longer.

 

i also hear what you guys are saying about multi grade viscosity and I'm clear on your points.

 

I took part as a lurker on a dodge diesel forum about 5 years ago in about a 50 page debate on the subject. One thing that I was not aware of and still not sure about is this- 10-40 is not 4 times less viscous hot then cold so 5-40 May never be as thick as 10-40 even at 100 whatever-anyway that's something I took away from that ridiculous long debate but never fully confident about the many arguments both then and now.

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We need @draginpegs to weigh in on this. He would know more about this subject than all of us combined. I was planning on going up there and picking his brain on the subject but I don't want to hoard the info. :)

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Actually Todd, I dont need to be a chemist, lubrication specialist, or rocket scientist to properly maintain my vehicles.

Yes, it helps that my occupation allowed me to deal with engines and lubrication issues multiple times every single day for 4+ decades(Goddamm I'm old!). And Ive visited oil manufacturers, oil suppliers, and have had seminars with both. Discussed oil-related issues with the various car manufacturer' technical service departments I've been associated with.

 

All one has to do is be a responsible vehicle owner. Read and follow the owner's manual and/or service manual. In short--use common sense and do your homework. A large percentage of vehicle problems ive dealt with stemmed from owners not taking the time to read the owner's manual. Then Ive had many who read it but didnt understand what they were reading. The lazy that didnt think they should even have to read a manual. Those that read it and said.."F*ck that--too expensive/time-consuming/I dont have the tools/ it's not fun/you name the excuses. Clubs, blogs, websites are great--but not really necessary when you've had all the info you really needed the whole time.

 25 different people(including you and I), ask a question and I believe you'd get 25 different answers. My answers are based on technical training and personal experience.

In terms of motorcycle racing or competition lubrication needs, I'm not an authority. Then again, I dont need to be. I just need to do what I can to ensure reliability and dependability in what I work on.

 

Bring your buddy into the mix--I'd be interested in hearing his thoughts.

 

Like I originally said..discussing oil use is like discussing religion and politics. Same as discussing octane requirements. Everybody has an opinion.

But, as always, you can argue theory, but not personal experience.

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One can never have too much information or knowledge (or experience). That's how we get smarter and make better decisions. I rarely make good decisions (as many here can attest) but it's not for lack of data. I would say that my decisions are "calculated". :)

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It's not the amount of knowledge that's the key...

It's the ability to understand the info

It's the relevance of the info to the issue at hand

It's the practical application of the info

It's the benefit to the consumer of that info

 

I used to remind them at work of the Sy Simms(Owner of Men's Warehouse, clothier) commercial tagline:

    "An informed consumer is our best customer."

My personal favorite is from Packard Motor Car(Luxury US cars from the '40s and earler(no, I wasnt there)

     "Good enough isnt good enough"

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I guess to clarify why I wanted input from Dan, is not to find out what is the best oil to use in my bike, but more technical information about oil in general. How oil is produced, how it is modified to meet manufacturers specifications, what does viscosity mean, how is it changed, etc, etc. That's info I like to know. By the way, I also like to understand how SpaceX's Falcon Heavy is built and how it's going to get people around the moon next year. But, I'll probably be asking rocket scientists about that. :)

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I watched all those old videos years ago. What's funny is when I went to Ranken('71-'73) those same videos were shown as part of the class.

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I know I've seen the differential one before but worth the repeat. :)

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Here's one of my late-model favorites. Great "bass" run.  This is the Ford/Mazda  L-Series engine as used in many Mazda and Ford products. Many similarities to motorcycle inline 4-cylinder engines. Turn it UP!

 

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