Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
stigsladycousin

'07 Ninja500r not starting

Recommended Posts

As with every single vehicle I've gotten, I've always had battery issues, especially in the cold.
After trying to start up my Kawasaki a few days after it was last ridden, it didn't want to start and did that horrifying ticking I've heard in car batteries. The lights would turn on with the key, but as soon as I try to start, even with the choke all the way down, it doesn't want to do anything and the lights shut off until I'm off the start. This was ~40 degrees.
When it hit 60 the other week, it turned on just fine.
Now it's doing the same thing again, even after we put it on the charger.

Is this a common thing when it gets cold out or am I just really unlucky when it comes to things that go vroom?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First...the disclaimer...I'm not a motorcycle mechanic...LOL

 

I would start first with the battery...ARE THE CONNECTIONS CLEAN AND TIGHT.

Next would be to test or just replace the battery...Does the bike start with a jump from another source...not just a battery tender.

Note...the lights might be working...however, battery too weak to turn engine over...

Second...possible the starter is going out...You will get a few "lucky" starts before starter will never work again.

That is as far as I can attest to.

ch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The connections are clean and tight. The previous owner kept this bike very clean.
It does start with a jump and runs for a few days then does this process again. It only started happening when it got really cold out.
I really hope that start isn't the case :c Had that go on with my first car along with the battery.
Seems like everything I touch dies hahaha

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only had that happen (bothn on suzuki savages) ended up just being dead batteries

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an ex500 for a while. It was hard to start once the battery went dead. It sounds like you just need a new battery. A quick way to test the battery is to hook up a voltmeter. The battery should be around 12.7 volts fully charged. When you try to start it, the voltage shouldn't drop below 10.8 volts. If it drops below that, you need to replace it.

 

Cold weather causes weaker batteries for reasons I don't really know, and cold weather thickens engine oil. That makes it harder for the starter turn which takes more juice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry (ZRX4ME) posted this in a related discussion

 

"If you have a voltmeter, half the battle is won.

You can try these simple tests: Read the battery voltage at the terminals engine off.12.6VDC is the ideal. If low, charge the battery for no more than 1/10 the rated capacity i.e. a YTX-14BL is a 14 amp/hour battery, so charge for 10 hours at 1.4 amps or a little less. Turn on the headlights for 10 seconds to eliminate surface charge. Disable the ignition, and crank the engine for 15 seconds--the voltage while cranking should not drop below 9.6 volts. If so, replace the battery. You would need an ammeter to correctly check the starter motor. You said it fired right up, so I tend to think your starter is OK. Check the rest voltage key off and note it. If possible remove the headlamp fuse to give a truer reading. Start the engine, let run for 3 minutes, then hold throttle at 3K-5K rpm and note the voltage. You are looking for approx 2V over rest voltage, most read 13.5-15.5VDC. Key off--remove the negative cable from the battery and if possible, place a 12V test lamp between the cable end and the battery terminal. It should not light. If so, you have a battery-draining current draw that has to be measured with, again, an ammeter. Voltage drops are another area to check. Which involves another 3 paragraphs, so...if you need/want--IM me and I'll assist.

 

Terry "

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it turns out to be a battery I have 2 batteries I pulled out of my zx6rs when I replaced them with lithium. If they are the same size you can have them. They were still strong when I pulled them out. I also have a meter and a charger if you wanted to use them.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was it the battery? Or something else...

ch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be the battery on the ex500 causing that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is something else to consider--oil viscosity.

Many of these bikes specify 10w-40 engine oil for most ambient temperatures and riding conditions. As per the manufacturer's owners manual operation above 90 degreesF 20w-50 may be what's called for, below 40 degreesF 5w20 may be what's called for.

If the heavier-weight oil is used in colder than normal temps, engine internal friction is much higher during cold cranking, while battery capacity is greatly reduced. The higher starter load takes that much more out of the battery while at the same time reduces available voltage to the ignition(and injection system if so equipped) system. All of which can leave you with a cold no-start condition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is something else to consider--oil viscosity.

Many of these bikes specify 10w-40 engine oil for most ambient temperatures and riding conditions. As per the manufacturer's owners manual operation above 90 degreesF 20w-50 may be what's called for, below 40 degreesF 5w20 may be what's called for.

If the heavier-weight oil is used in colder than normal temps, engine internal friction is much higher during cold cranking, while battery capacity is greatly reduced. The higher starter load takes that much more out of the battery while at the same time reduces available voltage to the ignition(and injection system if so equipped) system. All of which can leave you with a cold no-start condition.

True - lots of my old carbureted crap won't start when it's cold unless I point a propane heater at it for 30 min or so.

 

I have used thin oil and it helps more then most people think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

None of my ex500's had any trouble in the winter unless it was the battery , except for the first Gen "Viper" that had the flywheel have a come apart. I ran 15w40 and 20w40 before that never any issues even in the teens. I really doubt that oil has any bearing on the ex500. They are a hog on power to get them started, slightly bad battery add some cold and you get clicky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now when sub zero weather, it would crank and took forever to warm up. Thus I think bad battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which is why at several STLAR club meetings through the years I held battery clinics. Attendees would bring in their batteries, I would bring in the testers I use at work along with the testers I keep at home. Every battery brought in was tested for rest voltage and capacity so that the owners would know the condition of their batteries before riding season.

Testers were demonstrated, from a simple $100 unit up to the $1000+ unit I keep at work. Alternative testing methods were also discussed.

SO MANY TIMES I talk to customers that bought a new battery which didnt fix the problem. Their 1st thought is..."That place sold me a BAD battery!"

Diagnose, then you'll know exactly what's wrong.

Another aspect of battery testing...many only bother with battery checking/maintenance when they have a problem. You have your own tester, check the battery every month or every oil change so you know when it's getting weak. Better to find a bad battery in the garage than be left stranded on the street or on a parking lot.

And yes, a battery can fail without warning for no apparent reason...but there is always a reason. Best to tilt the odds in your favor by checking the charging system including the battery during cleaning, routine maintenance, or once a month.

It's not rocket science, and its isnt all that expensive. You can be master of your own domain with just a 2-amp trickle charger and a FREE Harbor Freight voltmeter.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can be master of your own domain with just a 2-amp trickle charger and a FREE Harbor Freight voltmeter.

 

Is it bad to leave a trickle charger on the battery all winter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it bad to leave a trickle charger on the battery all winter?

If its a 1.5-2 amp style that shuts off when battery is good (most do I think) it's a good idea to leave it on winter and summer.

 

 

Just disconnect to ride hehe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And that's exactly what I do--disconnect it to ride. With the dedicated SAE plug on both the Battery Tender and the matching plug on the battery harness there are no clamps to play with, no need to remove the seat or plastic. This was the regimen described to me by the tech at DelTran, makers of Battery Tender. Using it this way my original ZRX battery was getting weak at 7.5 years! Same deal with my CB750, that battery lasted 5.5 years. But I was never left stranded as I had the equipment and scheduled checking to replace when the batteries were just getting weak.

The deal here is not to let the battery get that far down to begin with, then have to charge it to get it back. Deep-cycling is harder on these batteries than just.."tending" it to it's normal rest voltage.

But even at that, DelTran recommends periodic checking the battery.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All 3 bikes are continuously "battery tended" when not being ridden.

If you have a liquid cell battery, make sure it's not low on liquid.

I found this during the drought of 2012, most years no liquid needed.

You can add distilled water, don't overfill, if very low battery most likely finished.

If winter time and added dis. water, ride bike or keep in garage with tender, if below freezing.

New water needs to mix (charge) with acid water before lowering the freezing point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the original batteries in my '08s until I put the lithium batteries in them last year. Never had a problem with either and never had them on a tender. BUT, I don't think either of them went more than about 3 weeks without being ridden.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My KLR sits a lot :( buts starts and runs fine when I do ride it. The SV stays busy during the warm months :D The Tiger gets regular use :)

 

ps...I have forgotten the last time I bought a battery LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kathy bike can have issues after only sitting 2-4 weeks so its always charged. I have two other tenders and just kinda cycle them around on the rest of my small army of batteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup yup on all that. IMO I never needed a battery tender on a good charging system, even with Viper(ex500) spending his 26 years out doors albeit under a room of sort but still cold and hot I ran him everyday even in sub zero weather and when the battery went or was going I knew it was happening. If you don't run them every day I could see the need for a float charger. When I say float I mean the .25-.5 amp turns it's self on and off those are sweet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...